The falls below Our Lake.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


You can camp along the creek below Our Lake.

 

THE DETAILS

Our Lake,
Lewis & Clark National Forest, MT

Saturday, October 8, 1994

Redwood and I began hiking at around 11:00. The air was warm, but the wind tended to cool things down a bit. A few clouds here and there to accent the deep blue sky.

Saw four grouse along the trail. Got some great views of Rocky Mountain as the trail switchbacked over and over. Since it snowed last weekend, lots of snow clung to the north-facing peaks.

The trail was mostly clear except for a portion on the south side of the drainage. I could see why they say snow drifts block the trail until around June or July. Since I didn't see any fish surfacing, we made our way around the lake and hiked up to the pass behind the lake.

My first sight upon reaching the pass was a bald eagle riding the currents high above the ridge line. Got some great views and photos of the Bob Marshall Wilderness and Our Lake to the plains. Forgot to look for the Chinese Wall.

I wanted to hike to Headquarter Pass but passed because of the conditions. Lots of snow on the northeast face and ferocious winds on the southwest side. It was so cold and windy at the Pass I could only stay for a short time hidden behind a boulder.

Back at the lake, I joined an old man fishing. He sat on the west end of the lake, out of the wind, clad in a hunter's orange parka. He must have been in his sixties yet he carried a tackle box and lots of heavy clothes up there. I talked to him a bit and he said he'd been to the lake several times this year and six times last year and today was the worst fishing he's seen there. Two weeks ago he caught lots of cutthroats, some of them up to 2-3 pounds. I felt just a bit of admiration for this guy.

Took lots of photos around the lake since the fishing was so bad. Never saw a rise or a swimming trout. Saw about ten other people there. All kids and adults up for day hikes.

Because of heavy use, you can't camp at the lake, but the campground below the lake isn't far and is a nice site.

Saw the tail of one whitetail on the way down. Also took photos of the South Fork Teton River with Rocky Mountain in the background. Took 1:15 to get up and much less to get back.

 

Sunday, June 18, 1995

Tried to do some early season fishing at the lake. It was a bit too early. A good amount of snow clung to the mountains after the camping area.

I could get through the snow easily, but postholed a few times. Otherwise, pretty good weather. Still, lots of wind in the open areas.

Talked with three other groups of hikers on the way up. The lake (elev. 7,300 ft.) was almost entirely frozen over, but it was obviously melting pretty fast.

Rested for a while at the lake and watched mountain goats amble along the ridges to the south of the lake. Went up to the saddle to see the Bob and find more mountain goats. Very little snow on the way up there. The snow was basically in the shaded areas.

Once I got to the saddle, three mountain goats spotted me from fifty yards off and went around to the north side of the ridge. Naturally I followed. Didn't see any more goats there but did get some more great views I wouldn't have otherwise seen.

I determined that I could hike down the saddle to the drainage below and hook up with a trail about two miles away. The bushwacking would be through a burned over area with lots of widow-makers.

Going back to the saddle I saw two more goats - they soon spotted me and quickly head off towards Rocky Mountain. In all, I saw between three and eight goats - they get around so fast, I could have been seeing the same ones over and over.

On the way down I got hail and rain. Also took the "old" trail that has been closed off. It starts shortly after the campground and goes to within fifty yards of the parking lot (elev. 5,800 ft.). Since it has no switchbacks, it's a lot steeper, but it is much more direct.

Redwood was sniffing something pretty intently on the way out, but I never saw it. (Headquarters Pass is 7,743 ft.)

 

Saturday, July 22, 1995

The snow and ice had finally melted, but there had been lots of rain lately.

Took Redwood up to the lake with me to fish a bit and check out the wildlife. Didn't see any goats, nor could I see the pikas that whistled constantly.

Lots of people at the lake, couldn't keep track of how many. People camping all around too. Talked to a few. Saw one guy catch a nice-sized fish on a spinner. Don't know what kind it was.

I fished a little but didn't get anything. A few small fish were surfacing, but the heavy wind made fishing difficult.

Rain began in the afternoon and didn't look like it would let up, so I headed back earlier than I wanted to. Stopped at Mill Falls on the way out. Neat spot, real easy to get to. The campground could be worth a stay sometime.

Back to Backpacking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Redwood and I at the pass above Our Lake.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Redwood looks into the Bob Marshall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mill Falls